Testing FANUC TP and KAREL Code

Filed under: Testing FANUC TP Programming KAREL Programming Workflow

UPDATE 2014/02/27:

If you're looking for a how-to guide on FANUC KAREL programming, you're probably better off reading my Introduction to KAREL Programming article.

One of the things I love about the Ruby community is its dedication and support for testing. Having very little formal computer science education, concepts like unit testing and integration testing were completely foreign to me. After first ignoring everyone’s advice to test now and test often, I eventually forced myself to learn out of necessity and now advocate the practice to anyone who will listen. Having confidence in your code is very important, especially when your code is the only thing keeping a $100k robot from crashing through a $500k machine tool. By testing thoroughly, it’s much easier to have confidence in your code and gives you the freedom to perform large refactorings while still maintaining essential functionality.

What?

Ok, that was a little heavy. Let’s dumb it down: a test is a bit of code that proves some other bit of code does what it’s supposed to do correctly. Taken a step further, Test-Driven Development advocates writing your test first, before you’ve even written the code you are testing to ensure that your test fails. You then write your code, run your test again, and hopefully it passes. Once it passes, feel free to refactor your code for readability, cleanliness, length, whatever, but feel confident that you are not changing the functionality because your test is passing.

How?

Here’s a quick example of how to apply TDD to some HandlingTool TP code. Let’s say we are writing a small subroutine that adds numbers together and outputs the result into the provided register. (Contrived I know, but bear with me.) Maybe we’ll write a test program like this:


  ! TEST_ADDER.LS ;
  ! ------------- ;
  ! Setup ;
  R[1:Output]=0 ;
   ;
  ! 1 + 1 = 2 ;
  CALL ADDER(1,1,1) ;
  IF R[1:Output]<>2,JMP LBL[404] ;

The first time we run TEST_ADDER, we’ll get an error complaining that the program “ADDER” does not exist. Let’s write the smallest possible piece of code that will fix this issue:


  ! ADDER.LS ;
  ! -------- ;

Ok, we don’t have to comment our programs, but you get the idea. We haven’t actually made the ADDER program do anything yet. That’s the point! Let’s run our test again. It now fails on the test case, attempting to jump to LBL[404] which does not exist because the output register is not equal to the expected value.

Let’s write the smallest amount of code to make this test pass:


  ! ADDER.LS ;
  ! -------- ;
  R[1:Output]=2 ;

You might say, “wait a minute… that’s cheating!” And I would argue that the program is actually doing everything that is expected of it, based on our current set of tests. We run TEST_ADDER again, and it makes it to the bottom with flying colors. Fantastic, but it’s not exactly what we want the routine to do. Let’s add another test to make it fail:


  ! TEST_ADDER.LS ;
  ! ------------- ;
  ! Setup ;
  R[1:Output]=0 ;
   ;
  ! 1 + 1 = 2 ;
  CALL ADDER(1,1,1) ;
  IF R[1:Output]<>2,JMP LBL[404] ;
   ;
  ! 2 + 2 = 4 ;
  CALL ADDER(2,2,1) ;
  IF R[1:Output]<>4,JMP LBL[404] ;

We run TEST_ADDER again, and although the program makes it pass our first test, it gets caught up on our 2+2=4 test. We could fool around and make this test pass without writing a functional “adder” too, but let’s not waste any more time. How about this:


  ! ADDER.LS ;
  ! -------- ;
  R[1:Output]=AR[1]+AR[2] ;

We run TEST_ADDER again, and voila! both our tests pass. What about our output register? We aren’t testing the use of of third argument.


  ! TEST_ADDER.LS ;
  ! ------------- ;
  ! Setup ;
  R[1:Output]=0 ;
  R[2:Output 2]=0 ;
   ;
  ! 1 + 1 = 2 ;
  CALL ADDER(1,1,1) ;
  IF R[1:Output]<>2,JMP LBL[404] ;
   ;
  ! 2 + 2 = 4 ;
  CALL ADDER(2,2,1) ;
  IF R[1:Output]<>4,JMP LBL[404] ;
   ;
  ! test third param as output reg ;
  CALL ADDER(1,2,2) ;
  IF R[2:Output 2]<>3,JMP LBL[404] ;

Our test now hangs up on the third test. Hopefully you’re starting to get the feel for the 1) write test, 2) watch test fail, 3) write code to fix, 4) watch test pass cycle.


  ! ADDER.LS ;
  ! -------- ;
  R[AR[3]]=AR[1]+AR[2] ;

We run TEST_ADDER one more time, and it makes it all the way through. We now have a fully functional “adder” routine. Contrived? Yes? Useful for demonstration purposes? Hopefully.

You may be wondering what would happen if we accidentally leave out an argument. What happens if we provide a String argument? Does it work with REAL numbers? I’ll leave it as an exercise for the reader to add tests for these cases.

KAREL

KAREL is a lot more powerful than TP. However, since the source-code is not visible on the controller, you’re pretty much working with a black box. I’d argue that because of this fact alone, it’s more important to test your KAREL routines to ensure that they work in all cases and fail in expected ways. The last thing you want is for a customer to call with a question about “UNINITIALIZED DATA” used on some line of some KAREL routine where they have absolutely no way of troubleshooting themselves.

Lets say at some point the requirements of your ADDER routine became too complex to do in TP. You decide to port your TP program into KAREL. This might be a little nerve-wracking if you didn’t have a TEST program that exercised its full functionality, but it should be no sweat to re-write the routine in KAREL, plug it into your TEST program, and once things pass, throw it right into your production system with no worries.

What about Motion?

Motion is a bit trickier to test. It also gets pretty difficult to test the complex interation of I/O between machines, sensors, PLCs, other robots, etc. Difficulty acknowledged, but I always try to test what I can.

One of my recent projects involved using a tool changer to switch between two different EOATs. Each subroutine would generally use one of the two EOATs, but the robot could start each subroutine with either tool in hand. If the robot had the required tool already, it should just move along. Otherwise it would have to drop off its current tool and pick up the required tool before proceeding. How do you test this?

I ended up using just a few routines:

  1. DROP_TOOL
  2. GET_TOOL
  3. GET_TOOL_ID

GET_TOOL_ID figures out what tool the robot is currently using based on the I/O state at the tool-change fixtures. DROP_TOOL would get the robot from wherever it is to the tool-change fixtures and drop off the current tool (if one is present). GET_TOOL takes an argument of 1 or 2 and takes care of dropping off a tool if required and ensuring the robot has the correct tool when things are finished.

To test this functionality, I just had a simple routine like this:


  ! TEST_GET_TOOL ;
  ! ------------- ;
  LBL[1] ;
  CALL GET_TOOL(1) ;
  CALL GET_TOOL(2) ;
  JMP LBL[1] ;

Simple but effective. If you start the test routine with no tool, it gets tool 1. If the robot already has tool 1, it simply glances over that routine and moves on try and get tool 2. If things are working correctly, the robot should drop off its current tool before grabbing the required tool while running in the loop.

I didn’t use TDD here, but I certainly could have. I probably would have started with the GET_TOOL_ID routine, writing tests to ensure that the robot ends up with the correct TOOL ID value based on simulated states of IO. I could then make sure the DROP_TOOL routine gets called if the TOOL ID is not equal to the provided argument, and I could verify that the result of GET_TOOL_ID matches the argument of GET_TOOL once the routine is completed.

The Pareto Principle

Follow the 80-20 rule. Don’t worry about testing every single line of code. Test what matters. The point is help you maintain confidence over your growing codebase but not at the cost of efficiency. Testing takes time, but trust me, taking a few minutes to write some tests that exercise some complex interactions can save you many headaches when your robot keeps getting stuck with a 100-pound part in its gripper with nowhere to put it.


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